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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 5, 2013 9:00pm EDT
>> tonight we start at the beginning, exploring the life and times of martha washington. >> martha washington was george washington's confidant. >> she was a person very absorbed in duty and very capable. but she didn't like that. she called herself a prisoner of state. >> by the same token that every step washington took to find the office, so in a very real sense kit be said everything martha washington did like wise. >> it was a business-like relationship, but not i think without affection. i think they had deep respect and affection for each other. >> it was as close to her how many town. she would own most of this block going back a couple acres, which mean she owned a huge chunk of what williamsburg was. there was a lot of tragedy in martha washington's life, she lost her first husband. she was raised a rich woman. now, what that means in 18th century is not familiesly what it means today. >> when she marries george washington she brings with her to mount vernon 12 house slaves, and that is really almost an unimaginable luxury. >> it takes her 10 days to travel here to valley
CSPAN
Aug 6, 2013 9:00pm EDT
of the early national government of the united states. >> last week in the martha washington program, we learned with great sorrow martha washington burned all of her papers, her letters, her correspondence with her husband george. only two of them remained. we have just the opposite here. thousands and thousands of them. explain the scope of the trove of materials that you have to work with as scholars through the writings of the adams family. >> the adams family gave to the massachusetts historical society a collection. we have never counted them individually, but probably 70,000+ documents over several generations, and probably about 300,000 pages. for abigail and john, which is the most important of the collection, there are about 1,170 letters they exchanged over the years. >> how frequently did they write to one another? >> it depended. when they were together -- for example, we do not have any letters after 1801 because after john leaves the white house, they're together almost all the time. for periods, for example, when there is fairly regular mail delivery between massachussett
CSPAN
Aug 7, 2013 9:00pm EDT
martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side with james madison helping him. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves mrs. madison. her equally famous response "that's because mrs. madison loves everybody." >> dolley madison came to her service as first lady with experience during thomas jefferson's two terms. the
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 7:00pm EDT
first segment about martha washington, you saw martha as the person who protected the aspect of the role, which was the social partner to the president, and hostess for the nation. then when you get to abigail, she becomes a political partner with her husband and pioneers that role. dolley is the one that brings the two of them together. she becomes the social and political partner for her husband. i think that sets all kinds of precedents for the future first lady. she is kind of, still, held up as a standard by which people measure themselves today. >> we will spend the first 35 minutes on those important white house years. it was such an interesting time for the country and we want to make sure you understand the history of it. later on we will go back in time and learn about her biography, how this young quaker woman became an internationally known first lady and we will end up with her legacy. that's what tonight looks like. we welcome your participation. throughout the program, we will have phone lines open. you can send us a tweet and use #firstladies. and we have a c-span page on
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 9:00pm EDT
, the night. we feature programs on every first lady from martha washington. today, julia grant. host: serving as first lady from 1869 to 1877, julia grant relished the role. she once commented that life inside the white house was a garden spot of orchids. growing up in a slaveholding family, she ended up as wife of the commanding u.s. general during the civil war. she and ulysses s. grant shared 37 years together that included the hardships of war, the challenges of politics, and eight years in the white house. welcome to our program, "first ladies: influence and image." tonight, julia grant. let me introduce you to our guests. bill seale is a member of our series. he is a longtime white house historian and the author of "the president's house." pam sanfilippo is a historian at the ulysses s. grant national historic site. she is also working on a biography of julia grant. i want to start with you. we last left the series with the johnsons after impeachment and the politics with the radical republicans in reconstruction in the south. set the stage for us as the grants come into the white house
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 9:00pm EDT
entations one. each weeknight at 9:00 p.m. programs on span, every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. e're offering the special edition of the book, "first ladies of the united states of america" presenting the of each and portrait first lady, comments from noted historians and thoughts from the role of a on first ladies throughout history. now available for the discounted of $12.95 plus shipping at c-span.organize/products. the website has more about first lady, including a special white , "welcome to the house" produced by our partner, the white house historical association. in the icles life executive mansion during the tenure of each of the first ladies. more at c-span.organize/first ladies. >> c-span. e bring public affairs events from washington directly to you putting you in the room at white sional hearings, house events, briefings, and onferences and offering complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house all a public private industry where c-span created by the cable tv industry 34 years ago by the local cable or satellite provider. hd. ou can watch this in >>
CSPAN
Aug 24, 2013 7:00pm EDT
on every first lady from arthur working to and. tonight, -- martha washington. tonight we focus on frances cleveland. >> frances cleveland was a celebrity first later unlike any before her.and the mass production of her image to sell a bride of goods by the consumer industry angered her and her husband, president grover cleveland. to help us understand the sensation sweeping the country, we begin our story inside 1600 pennsylvania avenue. for the first and only time in our countries history. watching frances cleveland into instant celebrity.>> this is the modern white house. it is the same basic layout as it would have been on june 2. when president grover cleveland and his bride to be came down what was then about large staircase to the family quarters at the west end of this corridor. they would have proceeded on the hallway, the music started up at the east side behind us here, where the united states marine band was assembled. the famous john philip sousa played the wedding march as the happy couple can down the hallway.-- came down the hallway. they would have passed through these doo
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 9:00pm EDT
of the images. martha was harder but we know the portrait is probably the best there is. i relied on that one. the rest were in photography, lots of photography. with all of that information, i pieced together images that i thought were good and representative. >> what is the process you go through when starting to work on a painting? how much work goes into the project before you start to paint? >> well, first i'll do the research and background and things like that of a normal portrait of someone i need to represent and almost life size and 3-d and sculpting too. i need to get to know them. i'm using it for a relatively small portrait. but a lot of the work happens first. the research and gathering and sketching. and what i started with is as a kid is pencil work. this is right on the board to make it easier for me. i draw on the board with pencil and keep going and going until i like it. getting the scale right, all of those things, and then progress from there. >> so how long did you work on this painting and that's from research through the painting process. even break it up if you have
CSPAN
Aug 13, 2013 12:00am EDT
on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. we are offering a special edition of the book "first ladies of the united states of america: presenting a biography and portrait of each, first lady" comments from noted historians, and thoughts from michelle obama on the role of first ladies. now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping at c-span.org/products. thewebsite has more about first ladies, including a special session "welcome to the white house," produced by our partner the white house historical association. it chronicles life in the executive mansion. find out more at c- span.org/firstladies. span, we bring public affairs events from washington directly to you, but he knew in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, briefings, and conferences, and offering complete, gavel-to- gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. we are c-span, created by the cable industry 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> next on c-span, some of today's annual am
CSPAN
Aug 20, 2013 12:00am EDT
and sells off government gold to bring that to a stop. host: martha is watching us in charleston, south carolina. caller: hi, susan. thanks again for another terrific show. you alluded to my question earlier in the show about the possible tension between julia grant and mary lincoln. then you visited the beautiful galena home that was given to the grants. i'm not sure, was it during the same time period that mary lincoln was try to get a pension out of the government, and here grant has a home given to him -- mary lincoln was in germany trying to educate her son tad, and i believe the grants later visited mary lincoln in france. guest: no, they crossed paths, but julia said she did not find out about mary lincoln being in the same town they were in until they were on their way out and could not change their plans. host: do you agree with the irony that mary lincoln was struggling and looking for a pension after her husband was chief executive during the war and the grants were just given these homes? guest: it seems extremely unfair to mrs. lincoln. guest: she was seeking pension from t
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 12:00am EDT
what they would like to be seen as publicly. then i went through the various images. martha was a lot harder. her portrait is probably the best likeness there is. so i simply went on that one. for the others, it was more on photography. , ih all of that information pieced together images i thought were good and representative. >> what is the process you go through in starting to work on a painting? how much work goes into the project before you start it? research andll the background. for a normal portrait of someone i need to really represent d, i needfe-size and 2- to get to know them. in this case, it is different with public figures and i am using them for a relatively small portrait. a lot of the work happens first, the research and gathering images. what i rely on the most is pencil work. i paint right on the board to make it easier for me. i draw a right on the board with pencil and going and going until i like it. getting the scale right and all of those things and progressing from there. >> how long did you work on this painting, from research through the painting process and
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)